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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
the outgoing pentagon chief set to lift the two decades' old ban on women serving on the front lines. plus, after months of delays, secretary clinton testifies on bernanke. -- benghazi. >> we had no doubt there were terrorists militants they killed our people. >> we were mislead there were supposedly protests and something sprang out of that, an assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest or guys out for a walk one night who decided they would go kill some americans. what the difference at this point does it make? >> shepard: secretary clintons testifying for the first time about the attack in libya. and facing fierce criticism. >> i'm glad that you're accepting responsibility. i think that ultimately with your leaving you accept the culpability for the worse tragedy since 9/11. i really mean that. >> shepard: tonight, her responses, the emotional moments. >> i put my arms around the mothers and fathers, the sisters and brothers and sons and daughters. >> shepard: and what we still do not know about the attack in
america." for the first time, the pentagon allows american women to serve in combat roles. britain, germany, and the netherlands are to their citizens to get out of benghazi, libya in response to an imminent threat against westerners. >> just touched a button. it hands you the picture. >> it brought us a new age of instant photography. tonight, we focus on the man whose polaroids help capture our lives in real time. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it is time for policy to catch up with reality. that was the message that leon panetta said today as he lifted a ban on women serving in combat. acknowledge in the sacrifices which have already been made by both sexes, he talked of a future where everyone would be given the opportunity to serve in front line rolls. what's the next greatest generation will be one of men and women who will fight and die together to protect this nation. that is what freedom is all about. >> leon panetta there. what do these changes mean and how does the u.s. military compare with other countries like britain? our
and delayed them by 90 minutes according to pentagon officials. then there is the decision by secretary of state clinton and state department under-secretary of management patrick kennedy who was in the operation center that night. not to send a foreign emergency support team, which the state department own web site describes as the government only interagency on-call short notice team poised to respond to terrorists ips dents. as a result, the f.b.i. could not enter the complex for 24 days after which point most evidence was gone. secretary clinton will be asked why more security wasn't provided at the benghazi mission after the june 6 bombing and why ambassador chris stevens left behind some of his security detail in tripoli. why the reck secrecy? >> bret: we'll cover it tomorrow. thank you. the pentagon says the al-qaeda affiliate in north africa is at the top of the list for suspects for algerian terrorist attack. three americans were killed. seven others escaped. the overall death toll there believed to be around 80. the task of identifying some of the bodies continues. algerian go
is no longer on hold. that's after the pentagon inspector general cleared allen of any wrongdoing in e-mail exchanges with a tampa, florida woman. allen steps down as overall coalition commander in afghanistan next month. the air force's top general vowed today to put an end to sexual misconduct within the service. figures for 2012 show some 800 reported incidents. many of the cases stemmed from a scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio. an investigation there found 32 instructors allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with nearly 60 female service members. at a house hearing, the air force chief of staff general mark welsh called the numbers appalling. >> there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the air force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. the goal is zero. it's the only acceptable objective. the impact on every victim, their family, their friends, the other people in their unit is heartwrenching. and attacking this cancer is a full-time job and we are giving it our full attention. so far, six training instructors from lackland have be
of defense has no changes planned. >> for more on the pentagon's announcement, i spoke a short time ago to a former army sergeant who served in deployment in iraq. thank you very much for coming in. let me pick up on what the lieutenant general was saying. he says it is not sexist but it would be lowering standards to put women on the front line. >> the military is not lowering standards. women have been serving in combat for a decade now. and one of the other issues that the military struggle is with -- struggles with is that only 25% of people qualify for military service. unfortunately, 75% are to physically unfit, not educated enough, or have criminal backgrounds. if we want to get the best in military service, we need to make sure that women are part of the population. >> you have to open the door for everybody. they would have to meet physical fitness standards. they're not actually lowering standards. few served in iraq. >> i did. >> you were shot at. >> we took small arms fire and direct fire. that is true. >> you were in a combat position? >> that's right, i went on patrol with
: brit, thank you. >> you bet. >> bret: just who gets to take part in future wars is changing. pentagon today formally announced the intention to allow a new group of fighters on the front lines. national security correspondent jennifer griffin tonight on women in combat. >> with the stroke of a pen, secretary panetta and chairman of joints chief ended a ban on women in combat. general dempsey said he realized women were already on the front lines when he got his armored vehicle in baghdad in 2003. >> i slappe slapped the terret n around the area and said who are you? she said i'm amanda. from that point on i realized something had changed and it was time to do something about it. >> panetta smoke of opportunity -- spoke of opportunity. >> in life, as we know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> marine such as ryan smith, retired sergeant who served in iraq thinks the decision puts lives at risk. >> my first sargent was mortally wounded in iraq and he was the tourett of am fibbous assault v
. more than a fewwise cracks. >> the pentagon has decided to allow women to serve in combat. [cheers and applause] the hope is that we can now finally defeat the taliban by giving them the silent treatment. >> geraldo: tonight, what happens to already stressed-out military families at home when infidelity and sex assaults are added to the dangers of combat duty overseas? plus: >> our wake gun laws allow these mass killings to be carried out again and again and again in our country. >> geraldo: a demo today in d.c. keeps the pressure on for gun control. but also today, at 51 gun shows in 26 states, gun owners pushed back and buy up. >> 100 million-plus gun owners in america are feeling put upon, like we are scapegoated for the acts of a psychopathic killer in newtown, connecticut. >> reporter: tonight, exclusive, inside the gun show loophole. and... judging jodi. >> you said you knew her. you see that photograph? >> yeah. >> do you know who that is? >> it looks like jodi. >> do you know anything about that? >> no. >> how about exhibit number 164? who does that look like to you? >> lik
of the show, the pentagon today will announce that women will now be allowed to serve in full combat roles. at first they'll be phased into roles working as medics and manning artillery, but eventually they could serve in elite commando units directly in the line of fire. for the past ten years, u.s. military women have served at the front lines in both iraq and afghanistan but never in combat. 152 women have been killed in the course of both conflicts. of course, we've been talking around the table about this. there are some contrarian points of view. >> yeah, there's a piece on the op-ed page of "the wall street journal" this morning. ryan smith is a marine infantrymen that served in iraq. he writes about "the reality that awaits women in combat. societal norms are a reality, and their maintenance is important to most members of a society. despite the professionalism of marines, it would be zrakting and traumatizing to be forced to be naked in front of the opposite sex, particularly when your body has been ravaged by lack of hygiene. in the reverse, it would be painful to witness a membe
happening on the ground. bill: jennifer griffin is on the front line of the pentagon every day. what will this change, if anything, for women in the military, jennifer? >> reporter: essentially, bill, this will open 230,000 positions that have previously been that woman in the military had not had access to. it will open the positions in the army and marines in particular because those are the front line infantry troops. secretary panetta plans to make the announcement later today. he will officially lift the ban that has been in place since 199 on women serving in the front lines. again this will be thousands of positions that women had previously been denied access to. the service chiefs have until january 2016 to seek exceptions to certain units. some of the special operations units for instance. women who have been affected by the ban say they were denied promotions as a result of the discriminatory policy over the years, bill. bill: jennifer, women have for some time have contributed to mightily to the war on terror. they drive tanks. they knife airplanes in the air force. a lot
there was no distinct central africa command in terms of the way the pentagon cleaved the world. in 2007 there was africa command and it currently is stationed in europe, not actually in africa. there have been a variety of initiatives to train the soldiers of different african regimes, counterterrorism training, other kinds of training and in fact the soldiers of mali. mali was one of the star pupils in the -- >> and they're the same people now we're fighting. >> right. so i want to turn to mali in a second but first i want to push back -- not push back but to play devil's advocate about this intervention question on libya. when you look at all the negative consequences of libya, what do you say to the point about syria? everything that you could say about libya, weapons, destabilization, refugees, everything that's terrible about what has been the fallout of libya seems to me happening in syria as well where there hasn't been the same intervention and so maybe it's just the nature of the conflict as opposed to what the u.s. or the west does. >> no, that's a copout. it's not the nature
. the pentagon lifts the 20-year ban on women in combat. opening new career opportunities for thousands of soldiers. live coverage coming up of secretary panetta's big announcement. >> perpetrators of these horrific crimes to attain powerful military-stiz weapons. >> can the weapon get bipartisan support? coming up here new york city kirsten with new details on her bill to crack down on illegal gun trafficking. and the lip sync controversy continues. stephen colbert. >> yes, lip-gate. beyonce-gate. the crisis in lipia. beyonc-ghazi. was there a second singer on the grassy knolls? mr. president, the american people demand answers. what did beyonce sing? when did she sing it? is that even beyonce? it could have been sasha fierce. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. as expected, senator john kerry technically still the chair of the foreign relations committee holding his confirmation hearing today and counted no op sxwligs at that meeting. joining me now is senator bob corker, the top republican on the committee. senator, is it safe to assume that barring some unexpected,
of the questions have come out of pentagon and have been answered about why it took so long. >> actually not satisfactory. how on september 11th, of all days, with all these warnings didn't we have assets there for seven hours to -- there's so many questions that -- >> so this is not over in your mind at all, not over. >> what did the president do during this period of time? there's two movies been made about getting bin laden with every ticktock of heavy minute. we still don't know what the president was doing, but more importantly, martha, more importantly than that, very quickly, is what's happening all over north africa? what's happening in the middle east? things are deteriorating in a rapid fashion, and it's because of a lack of american leadership. >> deteriorating certainly in north africa. a lot of presence of al qaeda. >> iraq, syria. >> let's go to syria and talk about syria. i actually spoke to secretary of defense leon panetta last week about syria, and he had some pretty alarming things to say. he basically said those shells that the u.s. knew they were loading, artillery s
world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." for the first time, the pentagon allows american women to serve in combat roles. britain, germany, and the netherlands are to their citizens to get out of benghazi, libya in response to an imminent threat against westerners. >> just touched a button. it hands you the picture. >> it brought us a new age of instant photography. tonight, we focus on the man whose polaroids help capture our lives in real time. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it is time for policy to catch up with reality. that was the message that leon panetta said today as he lifted a ban on women serving in combat. acknowledge in the sacrifices which have already been made by both sexes, he talked of a future where everyone would be given the opportunity to serve in front line rolls. what's the next greatest generation will be one of men and women who will fight and die together to protect this nation. that is what freedom is all about. >> leon panetta there. what do these changes mean and how does the u.s. militar
military brass. question, will the new pentagon policy on women in combat adversely affect military readiness? yes or no. susan ferrechio. >> i think the jury is still out. it is interesting what some in the military have said, that it could be a problem, create tension on the front lines. i think what senator mccain said, if you read closely his comments, we still have to maintain our superlative status as a military, and we can't let policy changes get in the way. of course, i empathize with women who want to be on the front lines fighting but i think first and foremost we have to preserve our superior military and make sure this doesn't change that dynamic in some way, which it could. >> susan, did you see that list it of countries that now have women in this role? >> you've got the number one military in the role. not those countries. our military. >> because women are excluded? >> no, because we've managed to stay number one, and i'm saying we need to stay number one and not let policy changes get in the way. >> women have proven themselves on the battlefield in the nature of w
to bring it here on c-span but the hearing went late. under way at the pentagon, a briefing with general martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs and leon panetta, the defense secretary, announcing a change, the lifting of the ban of the use of women in combat. let's get back to the focus of the phone calls here on c-span. biggest foreign policy challenge for the next four years. democratic caller in florida. caller: i have been watching the program all morning and i see the biggest foreign policy challenge in the next four years is not so much one that takes us out of the country as it is bringing democrats and republicans together to do what's best for our country in regards to foreign policy. that's where i see the biggest challenge in the next four years is bringing those two parties together so we can all be safe and enjoy the freedoms that we have today. host: do you think it makes it easier for that to happen with the president appointing someone like john kerry? caller: i think john kerry is a prime example of how we can probably get that done just because of his nature of br
, pentagon, and white house all were quick to call this attack terrorism. >> let's not forget, this is an act of terror. the perpetrators are the terrorists. >> terrorists should be on notice. there will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, north africa,not anywhere. >> the u.s. military sent a c130 and a transport plane to evacuate the wounded, but the algerians are still rejecting any foreign counter-terrorism help at the bp complex. those who escaped described how the algerian military straight the convoy of five buses leaving the compound hitting the first four. an irish hostage to escape told his brother the attackers but bomb built on them as they were transferring them by bus to another part of the facility. others praised the actions of the algerian military. >> ever been so relieved. going off site. >> yesterday the assyrians polled by that the incident was over. that's not true. >> west but to the algerian prime minister he told me that this first operation was complete but this is a larger complex site and they are still pursuing terrorists and possibly some hostages and o
commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up security and deal with what is a very dangerous environment, from east to west, then we have to work together. i also hope we're looking forward, because right now, libya is still dangerous, it is still in a very unstable status, and whatever we can do for them, we at least ought to agree we need to do and get out there and start delivering. >> one of the members of the senate foreign relations committee, who is asking questions, is the new hampshire senator jean chacin, former governor, democratic member of the committee, who was in the hearing room. you're joining us right now from the russell building. senator shaheen? and as we wait for s
center at the pentagon and the c.i.a. operations center. having works as an officer at the center i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of american citizens overseas is passed to other agencies mentioned above. if it is a significant message concerning american interests that is received it is the watch officers job to ensure the other agencies are informed." he goes on "there are many questions that need to be answered." i would like to present the questions. first, what was going on at the ops center of the state department in washington, dc, while our consulate was under attack if seven hours? >> we can certainly give you greater center but it is, as you have describeed, the place where communications go in and out. they were placing calls and receiving calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so we could respond in real time. >> seven hours? there should have been a response. why the delay if laboring it as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was? >> again, i would say,
at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as a watch officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of american citizens overseas is passed to other agencies mentioned above. if it's of significant message concerning interest received, it is to watch officer job to make sure the other agency are informed. he goes on, there many questions that need to be answered and would like to present them on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the op center in washington while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> they were placing calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own, but it help us acquire information to respond in realtime. >> in seven hours, goodness gracious. there should have been a response. why did the labeling attack as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was. >> again, i would say, congressman, that we described the attack. i described the attack the next morning and the president called it an act of terror. there was as you will find in reading both the unclassif
here in our country, there are new development this is morning in the national debate over the pentagon's decision to lift the ban on women in combat. some of the critics object to the policy, claiming women lack the physical strength to serve in the front lines and mixing genders in combat is not a good idea. but adhaveicates say women should be given the chance to prove themselves, noting that many are serving in combat-related missions with distinction and bravery, on behalf of a grateful nation. good morning and welcome to a brand-new hour of america's news headquarters. >> jamie: great to have you here. more news as the gender barrier fall, thousands ever front-line military roles could open up to women, as soon as this year. but some insist, men special women won't be able to serve effectively when they are working side by side. steve centanni looking at this. >> reporter: the debate continues, even though the policy has changed to acam the reality of today's military. women have been serving in certain combat roles for years. but with the stroke of a pen, last week, outgoing defe
of the united states senate. you can build a pentagon three times in that time frame. it's time that -- to pass a budget out of the united states senate and senator reid should not be paid until it's done. the house has acted responsibly. we have met our deadlines, we have set our priorities, i was part of the house budget committee when we put together budgets that try to get our out-of-control spending under control and rein in our $16 trillion in debt. the sfat has not acted one time in that time frame. it's time to make the hard choices and do the work necessary to restore fiscal responsibility to washington. it's time for senator reid to pass a budget or withhold his paycheck. thank you, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. we'll have order in the chamber, please. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i
command center at the pentagon and the c.i.a.'s center, having worked at the op center, i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of americans overseas is passed to overal agencies mentioned above. if it's of interest, it is the watch officer's job to make sure these other agencies are informed. he goes on. there are many questions that need to be answered and i'd like to present these questions. first and foremost what was going on while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> well, we can certainly give you greater detail but the op center is as you have described, the place where communications goes in and out. they were placing calls and receiving calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so that we could monday? real time. >> and seven hours, goodness, gracious. there should have been a response. why did the delay in labeling the attack as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was. >> well, again, i would say, congressman that we described the attack. i described t
uniquely what the pentagon doesn't, or the nro doesn't, over the civilian space. and that is a reason maybe not well enough understood why homeland has to be an independent player, yet many in the private sector, some of the business interests have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] spent i think that's what they call -- that's a leading question. >> one of the things we deal with all the time at dhs is perception doesn't match reali reality. and so perception is of how things work, you know, five years ago, seven years ago and the like. perception needs to catch up with reality. because point of fact, the department has moved light-years ahead in terms of its cyber capabilities come and we continue to move in that direction. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources that we need in order to do that. so when we talk about the interaction with the private pre sector, which we did in a number of other areas already, what we are talking about linking together the private sector that that pa
. martha: the pentagon is inching closer and closer to the date when they will see devastating budget cuts in our military. why one lawmaker says he thinks this is going to happen. bill: and this little guy becomes iran's latest hero. shot into space they say, we'll take about his journey into the great unknown or at least what iran says. martha: i wonder what he'll report back? ♪ some people call me the space cowboy, some wall me the gangster of love. ♪ some people call me maurice, because i speak of the poppatis of love. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ wh do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. bill: there are two people recovering from hypothermia after their small plane crashed and s*eupbd in th sank
underscored a new terror threat taking place right now in north africa. our pentagon correspondent, barbara star, is joining us. what are you picking up on this front, barbara? >> well, wolf, officials that i am talking to are saying the old 9/11 era of al qaeda spending years planning one single big attack, that is over. and this new era may leave the u.s. intelligence community struggling to catch up. mokhtar belmokhtar is part of a generation of terrorists rising across north africa, tied to al qaeda, but operating in very different ways. >> i argue they are more dangerous to both the united states and our allays. >> this is an era of a new threat, a threat to western interests across the region. >> reporter: the challenge for the cia? >> we can't keep saying, well, it's just yemen, it's just mali, it's just benghazi, it's just tunisia. can't do that. >> what we're seeing is a blending of different types of operatives and groups coming together at different times. >> reporter: africa-based groups don't seem to need central leadership and osama bin laden. militants have made advances. the
by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that controls the core infrastructure with our statutory irresponsibility to help protect the nation's infrastructure. when we talk about linking those things together from a security perspective, we are not talking about a regulatory overlaid. we're talking about how do you take part of our country that is -
. it shall take a lot to pull this off. >> the pentagon has started to take steps to prepare itself for the sequestration and planning that has not taken place until now. >> they are laying off temporary employees. it is starting to happen. >> senator inhofe has been critical about not planning earlier. the >> there is a little brinkmanship going. i do believe there was a time and when each everybody said we are all against it so how can have them? there never was a path that the two sides could find that would lead them to averting it. >> the center was critical of the president in the stance of his overall military and mention three ways the president has worked for cuts, and delays, and additions to the military budget. when you talk to officers of line, and you find them as critical of the administration that what is: on average is very dramatic. this represents a huge threat to the united states. there are others that would argue it is more a regional. the ability to react is clearly limited. when you look at individual things, there are concernes. afghanistan is another issue.
lines to the white house situation room, the national military command center at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as an officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat overseas is mentioned above. if the message is received, it is the officer's job to make sure that other agencies are informed. i would like to present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the ops center in the state department while the consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> we can give you greater detail but it is as you described, the place for communications to go in and out. they were placing calls, receiving calls, deeply engaged in trying to help us. they help us require information so we can respond in real time. >> 7 hours, there should have been a response. white the delay when it was immediately known that it was? >> i would say that we described the attack, i described the attack the next morning, the president called it an act of terror. as you read in the classified and unclassified version, there were a lot of questions abo
john kerry, who testified at his confirmation hearing. today, leon panetta announced the pentagon was ending the ban on women serving in combat. we will have >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training you can get is walking a foot beat. you learn how to develop sources. you'll learn how to leverage relationships in the community. people in the community trust you, they will tell you when things are happening better not yet a crime. you can intervene. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history, more with cathy lanier. >> secretary of state nominee john kerrey appeared at his confirmation hearing before the senate foreign relations committee. during this three-hour 15 minute hearing, he spoke about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his exp
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)

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